Hibiscus-Seeds-How To Plant

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Planting Your Hibiscus Seeds

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Dinner plate Hibiscus-Currently for sale on my Ebay site

Gently rub a nail file over each seed to thin the membrane, or use a utility knife to score a  small nick in the seed.

Soak your seeds in a bowl of Hot Water for at least an hour.

Get your peat pots ready with good seed starter. Fill within 1/2 in. to top
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Plant one seed per 2 in. pot. push down gently into soil and cover with more soil, about 1/4 in.
Black Gold 1311002 16-Quart Seedling Mix

keep seeds moist but not soggy. Use a sprayer to mist every other day so as not to disturb seeds.

Keep seeds pots around 75 to 80 degrees. A warm room with a sunny window will help.

Seeds will sprout in one month. Keep in sunlight until transfer outdoors.

Plant seedling in full sun to partial shade. Hibiscus needs 6 hours of sun a day. If your Hibiscus gets more than that, you may need to shade it. For the most show of flowers, 6 hours of sun a day.

Another Waybountifulharvesting.com

Although I have never tried this method, you could. I always lose my seedlings in the process of planting. Maybe you have successfully grown plants like this in the past, but trust me, Hibiscus is very tender and fragile. I simply prefer to root in dirt. But try one or two to see if it works. I think I will also try a couple this week. I’ll let you know with an update how it turns out.

Hibiscus are a beautiful addition to any landscape.bountifulharvesting.com

There are hundreds of varieties. So many to choose from. If you get one, I know sometime down the road, you will get more. Yes, they are spectacular.

FYI

Hibiscus is a genus of the flowering plants in the Mallow family, Malvaceae. There are hundreds of varieties. I only write about the non-tropical species. I prefer my Hibiscus to stay outdoors year round without the headache of bringing it in every fall.

When purchasing Hibiscus, make sure it does not say Tropical (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) on the tag. This is the species that has to brought in every year.

 

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Rose of Sharon Tree

Rose Of Sharon Bushes and Trees are also in the Hibiscus Family

True Story of my experience with Tropical Hibiscus.

In 1991, I was living in TN. Driving through town I saw this roadside stand with hundreds of Hibiscus plants. They were gorgeous.  They were for sale for $15.00 or 3 for $40.

I had 4 acres so I wanted to build an arbor along my long driveway. So I bought 21 plants for around $280

I couldn’t wait to get them home and planted. I spent the whole weekend preparing the planting area and boxing it off. I planted all 21 of my Hibiscus in one day.

I had beautiful flowers the first year.  That was it……There was a cold snap in TN that year. My beautiful Hibiscus died over the winter. Even in Central TN where the weather is mild, the tropical Hibiscus will not survive. Maybe some have, but not mine. I took real care when I planted them so it was not the way they were planted. I was crushed. That’s when I realized that tropical Hibiscus is useless to me. I also didn’t read the tag. It clearly said tropical. I guess that guy that sold all them to me didn’t want me to know I had to bring them in for winter. How would I have brought in 21 plants?

That was a hard expensive lesson to learn. That is why I am telling you not to make the same mistake. Do not buy any of the tropical varieties. You will be disappointed.
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Tropical verses Hardy
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One type of Tropical Hibiscus rosa-sinensis

Tropical hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) are evergreen, or shrubs that keep their leaves all year. Hardy hibiscus, members of the genus Hibiscus with more than 200 species, are deciduous. Their leaves will die off in winter. They can grow up to 15 feet and from 4 to 8 feet wide. A tropical hibiscus is shorter, with heights from 4 to 10 feet and a width of 5 to 8 feet.

So, get planting and enjoy your beautiful Hibiscus for years to come.

I’d like to leave you with a smile…..bountifulharvesting.com

Kitty Clark

Sources

Life Experiences

Ben Basney

Wikipedia

Warren Library

Author: kitty

My Son Kenny and I enjoy everything that is all natural. We enjoy nature , rescuing animals in need, advocating for the Homeless. We are getting back to basics and hope you will come with us and learn great ways to eat healthy, live peacefully, and enjoy life. Love all animals, it is the greatest love of all Help the Homeless, they all have a story to tell

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